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Go at your own pace
10 Sessions / 3 hours of work per session
Price
$124
Skill Level
Beginner
Video Transcripts
English
Topics
Makerspaces

MS-101: Starting a School Makerspace

Open for Enrollment

Would you like to enroll?

Enrollment for this course has closed. But you can enroll in a future offering (please select)

Enrollment has closed

Enrollment for this course is currently closed, but the next offering will be available shortly. Check back soon!

Go at your own pace
10 Sessions / 3 hours of work per session
Price
$124
Skill Level
Beginner
Video Transcripts
English
Topics
Makerspaces
Course Description

School makerspaces have become increasingly popular in the past half-dozen years. It's easy to understand why. Makerspaces engage students with hands-on learning opportunities, encouraging problem-solving and creativity. There's no better way for students to learn than by making things themselves with their own hands. If you want make or expand a makerspace for your own school, this is the place to start.

Your instructor, Adam Kemp, is a high school technology and engineering teacher who has started, run, and consulted on multiple makerspaces. He is here to share with you his in-depth knowledge and experience so you can get your makerspace up and running quickly and efficiently with a minimum of mistakes and false starts. By participating in this course, you will learn what to expect and how to handle it in advance. The result will be a well-run makerspace that provides a clean, safe, and efficient environment where students can learn and grow.


Defining Your Mission

You'll begin by defining a concrete mission for your makerspace, one that will serve even as the makerspace grows. This mission should be printed large and hung with pride as it defines the goals and expectations of anyone who enters.

Location, Location, Location

Choosing the right location is one of the most important aspects of starting any makerspace. It will dictate how many people can work at one time, what type of equipment you can support, how you teach, and what you can offer you in the future. You'll discuss locating a designated space, setting a budget, and exploring potential opportunities for fundraising. Once you have located your space, you'll create an initial floorplan and identify key components like doors, windows, outlets, and ventilation. This floor plan will lead to discussions of optimization and safety.

Keeping Track

A key to any successful makerspace is finding a balance between cultivating a creative work area and keeping it organized. It's also important to be on top of inventory for consumables such as printer filament and electronic components, as well as keeping track of tools and equipment. You'll learn simple techniques that you can employ to ensure that your students get the most out of the space and reduce the amount of time required to keep it organized.

Equipment

Selecting the right tools and equipment is essential to supporting your mission and they are often used to inspire future class projects. You'll learn about the tools you will want to have on hand and equipment you need in order to get things started and headed in the right direction. You'll see example equipment lists for makerspaces ranging in size from a single small room to a multi-room workshop and learn about key suppliers, as well as what not to buy. Of course, one of the most exciting things about making is the constant exposure to new and emerging technologies. You will also learn about some of these new technologies, as well as existing ones you should consider for future expansion.

Training

Even if you are the instigator of your school makerspace, you don't want to go it alone. You will want to learn how to train mentors and coaches to function as support staff. These mentors and coaches are instrumental to even the smallest makerspace and help distribute the time required to assist new users. In turn, this helps to build a community of users within the makerspace to keep your makerspace operating safely.

Safety

Speaking of safety, it is of the utmost importance and will define the success of your makerspace. In this course, you'll learn about correct placement of types of equipment relative to one another, how to maintain a safe distance around students working with power tools, and how to instill safe procedures as a given in your makerspace.

Classroom Integration

Once your makerspace is up and running, you'll want to look at ways to integrate it into your school across curricula. Depending on where it is located and who is in charge, the makerspace can become a vital component in supporting existing course structures across the discipline spectrum. With some creative planning and advertisement, your makerspace will quickly become one of your school’s most popular destinations!

Join the Community

All of the sessions in this course come with "homework" assignments. You are highly encouraged to engage with the homework, as well as to participate in message-board discussions and in sharing your work with others on our platform. This is your chance to be part of a like-minded community of your peers who share your passion for making in education.

schedule

Open For Enrollment

Session 1: Getting Started
Develop the right mindset for creating your makerspace based on the state of education and the impact making can have on education.
6 lessons
1. Getting Started: Developing an Understanding
2. Maker Manifesto
3. The State of Education, Part 1
4. The State of Education, Part 2
5. Budget Considerations
6. Practice
Session 2: Your Mission
Define your makerspace's mission based on what you want to do, what your room can support, and the age of your students.
3 lessons
1. Your Mission Overview
2. Mission Reflection
3. Practice
Session 3: Initial Layout
Brainstorm makerspace layouts from a portable "micro" space all the way up to a large room using sketches, CAD drawings, and 3D-printable models.
6 lessons
1. Initial Layout Overview
2. Micro Makerspace
3. Brainstorming Layouts, Part 1
4. Brainstorming Layouts, Part 2
5. Brainstorming Layouts, Part 3
6. Practice
Session 4: Location
Use two-dimensional CAD software to refine the layout of your makerspace.
6 lessons
1. Location Overview
2. CAD Software
3. Laying out a Medium-Sized Space
4. Laying out a Small Space
5. Laying out a Large Space
6. Practice
Session 5: Organization
Examine the organization of your makerspace in detail, including how to keep track of inventory and manage dust and waste.
5 lessons
1. Organization Overview
2. Organization Tips & Tricks
3. Inventory Tracking
4. Dust & Waste Management
5. Practice
Session 6: Equipment
Your makerspace will be defined by the tools it contains, from simple hand tools to complex equipment such as laser cutters and 3D printers.
8 lessons
1. Equipment Overview
2. What to Buy & Not to Buy
3. Hand Tools
4. Spreadsheet Example, Part 1
5. Spreadsheet Example, Part 2
6. Software
7. Machine Procedures
8. Practice
Session 7: Future Equipment
Future-proof your makerspace by investing in cutting-edge technologies.
4 lessons
1. Future Equipment
2. New Technologies
3. Expanding Your Capabilities
4. Practice
Session 8: Training
Teaching the teachers: training the mentors and coaches who will keep your makerspace running smoothly.
5 lessons
1. Training Overview
2. Roles & Responsibilities
3. Training Sessions
4. Inspiring Responsibility
5. Practice
Session 9: Safety
Ensuring a safe working environment is critical to the success of your makerspace.
5 lessons
1. Safety Overview
2. Revising Layouts
3. Leading by Example
4. Safety Tests
5. Practice
Session 10: School Integration
Bring your makerspace into the rest of the school by supplementing other curricula.
4 lessons
1. School Integration Overview
2. Consulting with Teachers
3. Inspiring Creativity
4. Course Review
Instructors & Guests
What You Need to Take This Course

This is an introductory-level course.

It is recommend that you have access to a 3D printer for printing out the equipment models in Session 3: Initial Layout.

You will need to set up a free AutoCAD account for practicing the layouts from Session 4 onward. Alternatively you can use any CAD software that you are familiar with.

Additional Information

Audience:

This course is intended for teachers, administrators, librarians, and parents who are interested in starting a makerspace at their school.

Participation:

To get the most out of this course, we strongly recommend that you engage in the homework assignments and discussion groups rather than just watching the videos.

Community:

The Web portal you have access to with this course affords you the ability to share your work and communicate with others in the community who are working toward the same goals you are. We strongly encourage you to become involved.

Outcomes:

When you have completed this course, you should be prepared for if not already engaged in designing, equipping, and budgeting your school makerspace, as well as setting forth policies and procedures that will ensure a safe and efficiently functioning environment for your students.